Thierry Henry joins global superstars to raise $2 million for UK tech start up Grabyo

Thierry Henry and Grabyo CEO Capon. Photo: startup.co.uk

Video sharing site now set for growth

If there was another reason to love Thierry Henry (in case you didn’t already), the former Arsenal player has just joined a group of investors who secured funding for a sports video sharing website- Grabyo, helping the tech start up raise a whopping $2 million.

The site founded in 2013 streams near live content and events on social media from rights holders including TV stations while incorporating sponsorship and advertising across all platforms. The company has worked with numerous broadcasting houses as well as social media sites Facebook and Twitter.

Henry said he was very thrilled to be able to support the company because he felt it was a great idea. “Being away from London makes it harder to keep up with what’s happening in European football […] Grabyo makes it easy for fans to follow the action by making the best moments available in an instant. I am looking forward to helping the company grow.”

The company’s CEO Gareth Capon said he was chuffed to have celebrities supporting the firm. He added that this was due to the firm’s positioning in the market and its relevance. “Premium rights holders now recognise the value of making content available wherever their customers spend their time, which is increasingly on social platforms via a mobile device. Meanwhile, brands increasingly want to align with premium video content and engage consumers at scale. As a result, video, mobile and social are the most important growth sectors of the global advertising industry – and Grabyo sits across all three.”

Other backers include Robin Van Persie, basketballer Tony Parker and Cesc Fabrigas.

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